Libya unstable two years after Gaddafi killed

Africa
FILE: Members of the Libyan Rapid intervention force unit patrol at a checkpoint on May 16, 2013 in eastern city of Benghazi in Libya, following an attack on a police station. Picture: AFP PHOTO/ABDULLAH DOMA

TRIPOLI - It has been two years since Muammar Gaddafi was killed by rebel fighters during the Libyan uprising.

On 20 October 2011 Gaddafi was killed after months of fighting. He had ruled Libya for 42 years.

The Libyan uprising started in the eastern city of Benghazi, and soon turned into a full-blown war between rebel fighters and regime forces.

Nato forces stepped in too, launching strike upon strike on the regime's installations.

The fall-out from the Libyan conflict has been far-reaching.

Most of Gaddafi's family is in exile. His son Saif al-Islam was captured by militiamen and is wanted by the International Criminal Court.

A second son, Mutasin, was killed.

Two years on, and Libya has a new government unable to handle the dozens of militia groups in the country.

The conflict saw the entire region awash with weapons, many of them used during the trouble in Mali.

Gaddafi may have fallen, but clearly Libya is far from stable.

Separatists want an autonomous eastern region, oil and gas strikes have crippled the economy and the drafting of a new constitution has been repeatedly delayed.

But the biggest threat to security in the country is militia groups.

Gunmen even managed to kidnap Prime Minister Ali Zeidan, demonstrating just how little control the central government has over the country.
 

-eNCA

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