Uganda appoints anti-gay politician to government

File: Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni said he has 'never stepped into the kitchen' since getting married 45 years ago.

File: Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni said he has 'never stepped into the kitchen' since getting married 45 years ago.

KAMPALA – Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni on Sunday appointed one of the architects of the country’s controversial anti-homosexuality law state minister for planning in a cabinet reshuffle.
 
The move to appoint David Bahati has reportedly angered some LGBT activists.
 
 
Bahati proposed in 1999 a bill that included tough sentences - including the death penalty - for active homosexuals.
 
The death penalty was removed from the anti-gay law that Museveni signed early last year. 
 
The law sparked an international outcry and was annulled by the Constitutional Court in August, based on a legal technicality.
 
"It is unfortunate that [Bahati] has been elevated to that position. He recently said that he will bring back the bill. It is like thanking him for his deeds," said gay activist Jacqueline Kasha Nabagesera.
 
The reshuffle, which was announced in the newspaper Sunday Vision, also included other appointments.
 
Deputy interior minister Matia Kasaija replaced Maria Kiwanuka as finance minister. Retired army general Jim Muhwezi was appointed information minister, Mary Karooro Okurut security minister, her predecessor Muruli Mukasa gender and youth minister and John Byabagambi works and transport minister.
 
Museveni was seen as trying to revamp the image of his cabinet and to cleanse it of corruption accusations before running for president again in 2016.
 
Analysts say the president, who has been in power since 1986, is trying to win votes from conservative Christians opposed to homosexual relationships.
 
"We will continue fighting for our rights and against any law as we fought the first one," Nabagesera vowed.