Global rise of white supremacy cause for concern: expert

The New Zealand attacks have thrust the threat of white supremacy into the spotlight. At least 50 Muslims died in shootings at at two mosques in Christchurch.

JOHANNESBURG - The New Zealand attacks have thrust the threat of white supremacy into the spotlight.

At least 50 Muslims died in shootings at at two mosques in Christchurch.

The global rise of white supremacy is a definite cause for concern, 25 years into South Africa's democracy.

READ: New Zealand mosque killer faces 'unprecedented' sentence

Writer and researcher Jamil Khan said the reconciliation project has failed.

"It [the rainbow nation] seemed more to be a project aimed at lulling white anxieties about being cleansed and being chased out of the country than it was about acknowledging and healing black pain."

Journalist Nechama Brodie said as a media researcher, the mainstreaming of white supremacist rhetoric has been enabled and normalised by media and the internet.

"We now have words of white supremacism becoming part of everyday language and they have a particular agenda. Their agenda is to tell us that there is this threat," said Brodie.

READ: Defiant New Zealand mosque attack suspect charged with murder

Brodie said South Africa has played a very important role in driving awareness around the term 'white genocide'.

Jasmine Opperman, the Africa director for the Terrorism, Research and Analysis Consortium, said the crisis is continuously created.

"Any person prone to violence to see that the only solution to this is via an act of violence is a reality in South Africa.

"We need to understand with all seriousness and start looking at it and addressing it," she said.

Brodie said South Africa has been used as a global inspiration for white supremacy using symbols like the old South African flag to represent militarised responses to black people.

Opperman said the debate needs to be steered away from a crisis debate to a debate where people are willing to open up.

Source
eNCA