Armstrong says doping lie would have continued

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Lance Armstrong says he would still be issuing strident denials if he hadn't been caught and then forced to admit to using performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France

LOS ANGELES - Lance Armstrong says he would still be issuing strident denials if he hadn&39;t been caught and then forced to admit to using performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France.

"If this stuff hadn&39;t taken place with the federal investigation, I&39;d probably still be saying &39;no&39; with the same conviction and tone as before. But that gig is up," Armstrong said in an interview with US news broadcaster CNN.

For more than a decade, the disgraced American cyclist Armstrong repeatedly denied he ever used banned drugs and bullied others who accused him of being a cheater.

Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles in 2013 for doping and handed a life ban from the sport, eventually admitting that all seven triumphs were fuelled by banned drugs.

Armstrong admitted to doping during a television interview broadcast in January 2013 with American talk show host Oprah Winfrey.

The Texan admitted to using substances like EPO, human-growth hormone and testosterone and other drugs during the many years he dominated international cycling.

"No one forced me or bullied me, so I am not going to say &39;It&39;s not my fault&39; I blame myself, that&39;s the bottom line," he said.

The 42-year-old Armstrong told CNN that his "day-to-day life is positive".

"I never get crap, not once, and I&39;m surprised by that. Sure, I sometimes get the vibe that someone wants to say something, but it&39;s never happened," he said.

Armstrong has granted several interviews of late but he denied it is part of a carefully orchestrated public relations campaign to try and rebuild his tattered image.

"I know at times it looks like it, but there&39;s no PR campaign," he says. "There&39;s not a big study room where we&39;re bouncing off ideas saying, &39;Let&39;s do Esquire, let&39;s talk to (CNN).&39; I&39;m just flying by the seat of my pants."

He added he plans to write a third book that "needs to be pretty intense and transparent"

"I need to write a book and it needs to be pretty raw," says Armstrong. "The book needs to be pretty intense and transparent. I need to &39;boom&39; -- put it out there and let it sit.

"The sooner the better. It has to be the right book, the right tone and there has to be totally no bullshit."