30 South Africans under 35 - Part 2: What do they want?

WEB_PHOTO_ELECTIONS_YOUTH_VOX2_042014

The 2014 General Elections are said to be the year of the youth vote. eNCA speaks to 30 young South Africans about how they feel about the elections.

The 2014 General Elections are said to be the year of the youth vote. eNCA speaks to 30 young South Africans about how they feel about the elections.

WEB_PHOTO_ELECTIONS_YOUTH_VOX2_042014

The 2014 General Elections are said to be the year of the youth vote. eNCA speaks to 30 young South Africans about how they feel about the elections.

The 2014 General Elections are said to be the year of the youth vote. eNCA speaks to 30 young South Africans about how they feel about the elections.

JOHANNESBURG - 2014 is being called the year of the youth vote.

It&39;s been 20 years since people from all walks of life lined up for their first democratic election. Those born into the new South Africa (dubbed the Born Frees) will have the opportunity to cast their first vote.

But will their vote make a difference?

The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) has reported that more than a million Born Frees have not registered for this year&39;s election.

This means that of the 25-million who have registered, less than 3 percent will be aged between 18 and 20.

eNCA spoke to 30 South Africans under the age of 35 years about how they feel about voting.

In Part 2 of the series they were also asked what criteria they will base their vote on. 

They also spoke candidly on what they hope will come from this year&39;s elections.

*Watch part 2 of the 30 South Africans under 35 series (in the gallery above) to hear what they had to say.