Jewish online publication apologises for comparing Tutu to Hitler

WEB_PHOTO_DESMOND_TUTU

File: South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu smiles during the Children's Peace Prize ceremony at the Ridderzaal in The Hague on 19 September, 2012. Tutu was awarded the awarded the $1.7-million Templeton Prize on Thursday.

File: South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu smiles during the Children's Peace Prize ceremony at the Ridderzaal in The Hague on 19 September, 2012. Tutu was awarded the awarded the $1.7-million Templeton Prize on Thursday.

WEB_PHOTO_DESMOND_TUTU

File: South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu smiles during the Children's Peace Prize ceremony at the Ridderzaal in The Hague on 19 September, 2012. Tutu was awarded the awarded the $1.7-million Templeton Prize on Thursday.

File: South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu smiles during the Children's Peace Prize ceremony at the Ridderzaal in The Hague on 19 September, 2012. Tutu was awarded the awarded the $1.7-million Templeton Prize on Thursday.

JOHANNESBURG - A South African Jewish online publication on Friday apologised to the country&39;s outspoken retired Anglican archbishop Desmond Tutu for publishing an article comparing him to Adolf Hitler.

The weekly South African Jewish Report (SAJR) had by Friday pulled down the article it had posted on its website the previous day.

"The paper apologises unconditionally to the Archbishop," it said, adding, "the offending piece has been removed".

The publication had on Thursday ran an opinion piece penned by a South African Jewish man, Leon Reich, in which he compared the "midget" Tutu to Adolf Hitler and Soviet Union&39;s ex-dictator Joseph Stalin.

"Constantly self-appointed destructors of the Jewish people appear in every generation," he said in the article.

"The latest self-appointed midget of history is Archbishop Desmond Tutu," he stated.

Tutu, a Nobel Peace Prize winner who is regarded as a moral beacon in South Africa, has long been outspoken about the Israel-Palestinian conflict, and has drawn fire from the religious right.

"Just as it was more important for Hitler to kill Jews than to protect the fatherland in the last days of the war, so it is more important for Tutu to kill Jews rather to protect his fellow Christians," said Reich.

Reich, who is the chairman of the local branch of Likud party, told AFP that he wrote the article in his personal capacity.

Alongside the article had been a black-and-white Photo-shopped picture showing a Tutu&39;s face superimposed over what was presumably Hitler&39;s face which included Hitler&39;s cap.  A black moustache had been drawn on this image with a black marker pen.

Reich said he was "disappointed" that the publishers of the newsletter had chosen to strike off his article.

"South Africa is a free country, it doesn&39;t matter whether one is in the minority or in the majority, you are entitled to say your opinion," he told AFP.

The publishers said the "unfortunate and mistaken placement" of the article "has caused serious upset among its readers and others."