CEO quits $2.8bn Hong Kong art project

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Traffic passes down a main thoroughfare of Hong Kong's Admiralty district on December 12, 2014 the day after police cleared away the main pro-democracy protest site.

Traffic passes down a main thoroughfare of Hong Kong's Admiralty district on December 12, 2014 the day after police cleared away the main pro-democracy protest site.

HONG KONG - The head of a huge arts district project in Hong Kong has quit, the third high-level executive to depart since the development scheme began almost a decade ago, local media said Tuesday.
 
Australian Michael Lynch, a former chief executive of the Sydney Opera House, resigned from the West Kowloon Cultural District project, citing health reasons, nearly four years after he was appointed, Radio Television Hong Kong reported.
 
His contract was due to run until next year.
 
His predecessor Graham Sheffield stepped down in 2011 also citing health reasons, while in 2009 the project&39;s then executive director Angus Cheng left citing personal reasons.
 
Apart from the departure of its executives, the project has been embattled by building delays and redesigns over the last decade.
 
The original design was by celebrated architect Norman Foster.
 
The ambitious 40-hectare government project, costing some 21.6 billion Hong Kong dollars (2.8 billion US dollars) includes a contemporary arts museum looking to rival the Museum of Modern Art in New York or the Tate Modern in London, 15 performance venues, exhibition spaces and a public park.
 
The city&39;s chief secretary, Carrie Lam, said Lynch wanted to take early retirement, and that she was sorry to see him go, RTHK reported.