South Africa to view longest eclipse in a century

The "supermoon" rises on September 28, 2015 in Godewaersvelde. Skygazers were treated to a rare astronomical event when a swollen "supermoon" and lunar eclipse combined for the first time in decades, showing the satellite bathed in blood-red light.
AFP

JOHANNESBURG - Skywatchers around the world will have sight of the longest total lunar eclipse of the century on Friday.

The moon will be transformed into a reddish orange colour.

The eclipse will be visible in South Africa from 20h24 and then from 21h30 to 23h13. It will be a total eclipse.

The eclipse will end at 00h19 on Saturday morning in South Africa.

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According to the Astronomical Society of Southern Africa (ASSA), most of Africa, Europe, the Middle East and eastern Asia will see this eclipse.

However, for far western Africa and Europe, the eclipse will have started by the time the moon rises.

Onlookers will not need any special equipment to view the eclipse as it will be visible with the naked eye, although having binoculars or a telescope will make it more fun.

“Just go out and look.  Don’t miss Mars – the bright orange “star” near the moon on eclipse night,” the ASSA said.

The next total lunar eclipse visible from start to finish from anywhere in Africa is in 2025 and is expected to start at 18h27.

 

Source
eNCA