Rates hikes unjustified: Gauteng premier

web_photo_Premier_residence_07122016

The unused official residence of the Gauteng premier, in Bryanston, which is to be auctioned off.

The unused official residence of the Gauteng premier, in Bryanston, which is to be auctioned off.

web_photo_Premier_residence_07122016

The unused official residence of the Gauteng premier, in Bryanston, which is to be auctioned off.

The unused official residence of the Gauteng premier, in Bryanston, which is to be auctioned off.

JOHANNESBURG, March 7 (ANA) - Gauteng Premier David Makhura expressed concern on Wednesday over the proposed property rates increase in the City of Johannesburg following the release of its municipal valuations recently.

Johannesburg Mayor Herman Mashaba has said that that 8,000 owners whose properties appear to have been overvalued would receive notices that these had been identified as problematic.

READ: Mayor Mashaba addresses over-valued properties

The valuations of these properties had resulted in massive rates increases, some more than 100 percent.

But many other ratepayers have objected to the city&39;s proposed valuations.

Some have started a petition against the high prices being set on their assets on the council’s new valuation roll.

Makhura said the rates hike would put financial strain on residents, who are already buckling under pressure due to the weak economic environment.

"As I said in the State of the Province Address, life has been tough for many of our residents. The price of food, electricity and transport has been sky-rocketing, placing enormous stress on family finances.

"These rate increases will negatively affect the real income of families," Makhura said.

"I hope the council is listening to the reactions of the ratepayers and will take their views into consideration when it takes its final decision on the matter."

Makhura said he would discuss the valuations further with Mashaba and appeal to him to ensure that Johannesburg residents are not unduly overburdened with unjustified rates hikes.