ACDP calls for corporal punishment despite ConCourt ruling

Some political parties are calling for the Constitution to allow for the use of corporal punishment in schools and at home. Courtesy of #DSTV403

JOHANNESBURG - Some political parties are calling for the Constitution to allow for the use of corporal punishment in schools and at home.

In September, the Court banned the spanking of children as a form of discipline.

The African Christian Democratic Party leader,  Reverend Kenneth Meshoe said, "particularly if one looks at outcomes that are undesirable in the schools, you have violence in the forms of stabbings, beatings of teachers increasing."

"Now if people are saying there are other forms, alternative forms of discipline, those alternative forms are not working." 

READ: Teacher safety highlighted by Sace

Meshoe said, "children are becoming so unruly that even on my way here I called one of the teachers to ask what is the latest in the schools, she said it is difficult because these children are swearing and cursing at teachers and if you swear back and curse, you are in trouble with the department. So teachers are caught in a very difficult situation."

"If rights were balanced with responsibilities, we'd be having better outcomes than we're having today."

Clinical Psychologist, Khosi Jiyane weighed in saying, "we cannot as a society afford to be dichotomous in our thinking, it cannot be a matter of either/or, because corporal punishment on its own will never work. It is never a solution on its own. But equally then, we cannot throw the baby out with the bathwater and then say there needs to be zero corporal punishment in families and homes."

Source
eNCA