Explosive CIT robberies increasing again

Now that South Africa’s fragile economy is opening up again, cash-in-transit robberies are picking up. Those in the industry say it’s time for a more united fight against criminals. Graeme Raubenheimer has the full story. Courtesy #DStv403

JOHANNESBURG - Now that South Africa’s fragile economy is opening up again, cash-in-transit robberies are picking up.

Those in the industry say it’s time for a more united fight against criminals.

While the latest police crime stats show CIT robberies are down by 10 percent and the SA Banking Risk Information Centre confirms there’s been a five percent drop year-on-year, thieves are back, combing the streets.

READ: Cash heist criminals adjusting tactics: police commissioner

“When the lockdown began, we saw a complete lull in the number of attacks on cash vans," said anti-crime activist Yusuf Abramjee.

"When the lockdown regulations were relaxed, we suddenly saw a dramatic increase in CIT robberies especially in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal and Western Cape, but Gauteng has been the hardest hit.”

Earlier this month, Fidelity confirmed three separate attempted attacks on its cash vans in three different provinces, all in the space of 30 minutes.

READ: Cele: Decrease in crime from April to June

Grant Clark of the CIT Association for South Africa said people collecting Sassa grants are affected by CIT robberies.

“A lot of this cash is being taken to pension payouts at month-end, so if there’s a heist, that money doesn’t reach the pension payouts,” Clark said.

Clark wants to formalise the association by year-end and bring roleplayers together so they can put up one coordinated fight against South Africa’s ongoing CIT heist problem.

* eNCA reporter Graeme Raubenheimer filed this report. Watch the video above.

Source
eNCA