At least 34 dead after Uganda landslide

Survivors look at the aftermath as flood waters pass through destroyed homes, after a landslide rolled down the slopes of Mt. Elgon through their village in Bududa district, Uganda.

Survivors look at the aftermath as flood waters pass through destroyed homes, after a landslide rolled down the slopes of Mt. Elgon through their village in Bududa district, Uganda.

Reuters

KAMPALA - At least 34 people were killed after a river in eastern Uganda burst its banks, sending thick sludge and rocks barrelling into homes, disaster officials said Friday.

Rescue teams were picking through the rubble, looking for survivors and victims of the disaster which took place on Thursday in the town of Bukalasi in the Bududa district. An unknown number of people were still missing.

"I can confirm 34 people are dead. We have to wait for our assessment to be completed before we can say how many are missing," said Uganda Red Cross spokeswoman Irene Nakasiita.

On Thursday she shared photos on WhatsApp of the scene of what she described as a "massive landslide", including images of dismembered corpses caked in mud laid out by the river. 

Some of the bodies had been partly covered with banana leaves by members of the public. 

"The cause was the river bursting its banks upstream following heavy rain. When the water flowed down it brought a number of big stones with it that destroyed people's houses," Nakasiita said.

"Our search and rescue team is still on the ground evacuating people and removing them from the rubble."

She said the Red Cross was sending relief supplies to the area, such as tarpaulins, blankets and water purification tablets.

Government meteorologist Godfrey Mujuni said it was the River Sume, a tributary of the River Manafwa, that had burst its banks.

"It's a mountainous region and because of the high altitude and steep slopes even a small amount of rain can trigger landslides. There is no early warning system in that particular area hit yesterday."

"The rains are still coming and the government and NGOs need to keep their preparedness levels high."