SA children becoming more violent: Cosas

The killing of Thoriso Themane, allegedly by a group of teens is being cited by one expert as an example of how normalised violence has become.

JOHANNESBURG - The Congress of South African Students (Cosas) says it is concerned that school pupils are becoming more violent.

The organisation believes visits to prison by children who display violent behaviour could be a solution.

READ: Police commissioner condemns killing of Themane

The killing of Thoriso Themane, allegedly by a group of teens is being cited by one expert as an example of how normalised violence has become in South Africa.

Five teenagers have been arrested in connection with Themane's death.

His killing follows several other recent violent incidents involving young people.

A 14-year-old pupil was stabbed to death by a fellow pupil in Delareyville in the North West this month.

Last year, a Grade 1 boy was stabbed and killed by a Grade 11 pupil, while a 17-year old North West pupil also stabbed his 24-year-old teacher to death.

In Gauteng last week a schoolboy was caught on camera assaulting a classmate.

READ: Five arrested for Thoriso Themane's murder
 

One academic says while it's difficult to pinpoint a single reason for violence, in most cases children and young adults mimic what they see.

Professor Jace Pillay from UJ's Department of Educational Psychology said, "if they have been exposed to violence even in their childhood, they then grow up thinking that violence is normal behaviour so when they are in situations where they cannot react in any positive way they then use violence as means of reaction"

Pillay says there is another contributing factor, "substance abuse also play a major role in terms of the violence we see.

"In terms of what we need to do, we must create a platform to deal with this problem."

Cosas says it's working hard to help address the scourge of violence.

Both professor Pillay and Cosas agree practical solutions are needed to deal with violence, especially as committed by young people.

 

Source
eNCA