State capture: How a cash-in-transit business laundered money

A company trading as a cash-in-transit business was actually a bank. Kalandra Viljoen testified at the state capture inquiry on Monday. Courtesy #DStv403

JOHANNESBURG - A company trading as a cash-in-transit business was actually a bank.

Kalandra Viljoen testified at the state capture inquiry on Monday.

Her company, Asset Movement Financial Services, transferred millions in cash that may have assisted with money laundering.

Viljoen was director between 2014 and early 2018

It took large deposits from clients and for a fee, would deliver cash in exchange on the same day.

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Viljoen appeared oblivious of the legislative requirements of someone in her industry.

“I was under the impression or my impression was that if it's electronic transfer, that it's the bank's responsibility to source where the funds come from where if it was cash then it was my responsibility to see where the funds where coming from," said Viljoen.

By failing to properly vet clients, Viljoen says she didn’t know that in 2015, R9-million transferred to her came from a North West company called Koreneka and not businessman George Markides.

Evidence over the weekend alleged Koroenka was a hijacked company used to loot money from SA Express and the North West government.

Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo says companies fronting as CIT entities must be urgently investigated by the relevant regulatory bodies.

Source
eNCA