Two dozen police hurt in Memphis after marshals kill black man

At least 24 officers and deputies were injured, with six hospitalised, during the confrontation.

At least 24 officers and deputies were injured, with six hospitalised, during the confrontation.

Facebook/Memphis Police Department

MEMPHIS - At least two dozen police officers were injured in overnight clashes with protesters, some throwing rocks, in Memphis, Tennessee, after US Marshals Service agents fatally shot a black man during an attempted arrest, officials said.

The man, identified as 20-year-old Brandon Webber, was shot by the agents after he rammed his vehicle into their vehicles as they sought to arrest him on multiple warrants at about 7pm on Wednesday in the working-class neighbourhood of Frayser, according to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

The bureau said Webber was carrying an unspecified weapon when he got out of his vehicle.

At least 24 officers and deputies were injured, with six hospitalised, during the confrontation, Mayor Jim Strickland said in a statement, adding that two journalists also were injured.

The injuries were mostly minor, police said, and the crowd eventually dispersed. It was not clear how many civilians were hurt or whether anyone was arrested.

Shortly before he was shot, Webber posted a live video on Facebook that showed him in a car, rapping and apparently smoking a marijuana cigarette.

In the video, he looked out the window and said he saw police. With a laugh, he looked directly into the camera and said the officers would "have to kill me."

Authorities did not state the reason for the arrest warrants.

The tense scene afterward raised the possibility of more disturbances in the predominantly black city, evoking memories of a string of sometimes violent protests against police brutality that broke out in other cities in recent years.

Those clashes, notably many days of protests after an unarmed black man was killed in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014, gave rise to the Black Lives Matter movement.

Source
Reuters