WATCH: Is solar power the answer to load-shedding?

With the possibility of 2 years of load-shedding, the time has never been better to move to solar power.  Eskom’s André de Ruyter told eNCA there will have to be some kind interruption for at least 18 months so as to rebuild capacity. Courtesy #DStv403

JOHANNESBURG - With the possibility of two-years of load-shedding, the time has never been better to move to solar power.

Eskom CEO André de Ruyter told eNCA there will have to be some kind interruption for at least 18 months so as to rebuild capacity.

In Australia, businesses and domestic consumers installed more than 2,000 megawatts of rooftop solar panels last year.

This is equivalent to stage two load-shedding.

What would it take to do the same in South Africa?

READ: Eskom, Nersa fight it out in court over tariffs

South Africa has an abundance of sun and despite occasional rain and miserable weather, it’s more reliable than Eskom in its current state. So why not harness this free resource?”

There are about 2,000 rooftop solar power installers in the country.

A so-called grid-tied system that is ideal for surviving load-shedding by reducing reliance on Eskom requires solar panels, an inverter and batteries.

READ: SA's electricity crisis: Load-shedding likely to continue

The setup for a three-bedroom house could cost between R120,000 and R150,000.

Solar power appears to be the light at the end of South Africa’s deep, dark power crisis tunnel.

With the right support from government -- it could free up the capacity Eskom needs to do maintenance, and reduce the need for load-shedding altogether.

Source
eNCA