Western Cape embarks on vaccine education drive

With COVID-19 infections having dropped significantly in the Western Cape, the main focus now, is getting people vaccinated. Healthcare workers are first in line to get the jab during the first phase. Western Cape’s health department has embarked on a campaign to educate people about the benefits of the vaccine. Ayesha Ismail reports. Courtesy #DStv403

CAPE TOWN - With COVID-19 infections having dropped significantly in the Western Cape, the main focus now is getting people vaccinated. 

Healthcare workers are first in line to get the jab during the first phase. 

While nobody will be forced to take the vaccine, health authorities are urging all frontline health staff to get vaccinated as soon as possible. 

READ: COVID-19: Call for more people to be vaccinated

The Western Cape’s health department has embarked on a campaign to educate people about the benefits of the vaccine. 

More than 8,000 Western Cape health employees contracted COVID-19 from the first wave into the second wave. 

More than 900 of them had to be hospitalised. Sadly over a hundred died.

READ: J&J vaccine will prevent severe illness: Prof. Glenda Gray

Health authorities say they're physically and emotionally fatigued and traumatised. 

Western Cape Head of Health Keith Cloete said: "We need to start a process of healing and walk that process together. Within that process of healing, one area of hope is the introduction of a vaccine. "

An important part of the Western Cape's "Let's unite to vaccinate" campaign is to provide scientifically sound and credible information about the COVID-19 vaccine.

READ: Private and public sectors must collaborate on inoculation drive: expert

"Whilst we need to remember that taking the vaccine is one's choice but what I am urging you to do is to make the right choice," said Nomafrench Mbombi, Western Cape Health MEC.

"Not only for you to be protected but for you to protect the other person. And when it starts with us as healthcare workers it means that others will follow suit."


Health officials said people need to hear accurate information that will help them make the best choices for themselves.

* eNCA's Ayesha Ismail reports. 

Source
eNCA

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