Anti-apartheid activist wishes ANC didn't govern

The ANC won't regain control of the Nelson Mandela Metro until it stops stealing government money, anti-apartheid activist Mkhuseli Jack said at a reburial ceremony for six activists who died in in the late 1980's. Video: eNCA

PORT ELIZABETH - Anti-apartheid activist Mkhuseli Jack wishes the ANC didn’t govern the country.

Jack also said the party won't regain control of the Nelson Mandela Metro until it stops stealing government money.

“This freedom must bring results for our people,” said the former UDF leader who was speaking in Port Elizabeth at the reburial of six activists who were executed by the apartheid government in the late 1980's.

“It must never allow them to regress and the only way you can get back to power is to start being humble.

“This is the good beginning. If you do that, you will get back to power and govern us properly and not steal people’s money. For as long as you think that you have a right to steal, then forget it. I wish that you never govern this country.“

READ: UDF veterans blast ANC leaders

The ANC lost control of the Nelson Bay Municipality after the 2016 local government elections.  The Democratic Alliance led coalition government now leads Port Elizabeth.

ANC Nelson Mandela Bay chairperson Phumzile Tshuni said that the cause of which the actvivists died for should not be forgotten.

“Some people today speak from comfort zones because these comrades did not struggle for money,” said Tshuni.

“They were not millionaires or billionaires.

“They didn’t have businesses. They did not fight for tenders but for better life for all. “

The remains of the six UDF activists were reburied at a Heroes Acre in the Zwide cemetery, where other political luminaries such as Govan Mbeki and Raymond Mhlaba are buried.

After almost 30 years buried in an unmarked grave in Mamelodi in Pretoria, freedom fighter Thobile Lloyd was finally given a decent funeral on Saturday by his family.

A 27-year-old political activist Thobile was hanged, leaving behind his parents and a partner with two young daughters.

"We never saw our father. I was only 4-months-old when he was arrested in 1985,” said Llyod’s daughter Andiswa Vimba.

“My sister was just 2-years-old. We were very young at that time. We only know him through photos. That’s why this day saddens us.”

His family says little has changed since he died for freedom. They live in an RDP house, and survive on their mother’s pension.

His two surviving daughters are unemployed and his father died while waiting for his remains to be brought home.

 


 

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