WATCH: Van Breda trial postponed to 27 November

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The trial against triple-axe-murder-accused Henri van Breda continues on Tuesday. The Western Cape magistrate's court has heard that Van Breda was diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

The trial against triple-axe-murder-accused Henri van Breda continues on Tuesday. The Western Cape magistrate's court has heard that Van Breda was diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

WEB_PHOTO_VAN_BREDA_COURT_RECORDED_141117

The trial against triple-axe-murder-accused Henri van Breda continues on Tuesday. The Western Cape magistrate's court has heard that Van Breda was diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

The trial against triple-axe-murder-accused Henri van Breda continues on Tuesday. The Western Cape magistrate's court has heard that Van Breda was diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

 

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CAPE TOWN - The trial against murder-accused Henri van Breda was again postponed in the Western Cape High Court.

 The trial will resume on Monday 27 November.

He faces three charges of murder, one of attempted murder and one of defeating the ends of justice for allegedly killing his mother, father and brother, and seriously injuring his sister.

On Monday, the court heard that Van Breda spent the weekend at Constantiaberg Medi-Clinic, a private hospital in Cape Town, where he was diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy after a series of medical tests.

Piet Botha, for Van Breda, told the court that the 23-year-old had a seizure on Wednesday, and was hospitalised on Thursday and examined by neurologist Dr James Butler.

READ: Henri van Breda diagnosed with epilepsy

The defence was due to call a psychologist on Monday, but proceedings were postponed to give her time to amend her report if she deemed it necessary, as she has not yet had sight of the neurologist’s report.

Judge Siraj Desai said ethical issues may arise, however, as the neurologist -- Dr James Butler -- had been a potential State witness whom they ultimately did not call, but had consulted.

Van Breda has pleaded not guilty to murdering his father, Martin, brother Rudi and mother Teresa.

His sister Marli, who was 16 at the time of the January 2015 attacks, survived but suffered severe head injuries and has retrograde amnesia.

He claims that an intruder, armed with an axe and knife, and wearing dark clothing, a balaclava and gloves was behind the attacks.

He said, in his plea explanation, that during the pursuit of the attacker he lost his footing and fell down the stairs.