CheckPoint: Girls must be assertive over rape - Masutha

File: For a year, taxi driver Lebogang Mokoena -- one of South Africa’s most notorious serial rapists -- terrorised large parts of Johannesburg.

File: For a year, taxi driver Lebogang Mokoena -- one of South Africa’s most notorious serial rapists -- terrorised large parts of Johannesburg.

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JOHANNESBURG - Justice Minister Michael Masutha was left stammering after telling CheckPoint&39;s Nkepile Mabuse girls must be more assertive about rape.

During the interview Masutha says, "We need to look at the situation in families, how are we training our boys as they grow up in terms of their gender attitude? How are we training our girls in terms of their capacity to be assertive?"

These comments were met by adverse reactions from Checkpoint&39;s viewers.

The minister later explained that in his view assertive women were more likely to report rape. But should it be that way?

 

 

 

Fifteen years ago, Interpol released a staggering statistic: one in two women living in South Africa would be raped in their lifetimes.

There was outrage and thereafter, SAPS stopped releasing rape statistics. Instead the authorities began categorizing rape under sexual violence.

Was this a calculated ploy to divert attention from an inability to deal with a patriarchal scourge that dates back to the colonial era?

Sexual offences laws have much been improved in recent years, but if service culture at police stations remains dismal and preconceived attitudes in the judiciary persist – surely little will change.

Producer Busisiwe Gumede explores these issues which were recently highlighted by Rhodes University&39;s RUReferenceList campaign. The campaign garnered support from universities across the country.

 

 

 

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