CheckPoint: Men of God?

web_photo_Prophet Penuel

A post on Facebook as revealed a prophet who commands rocks into bread and cloth to taste like chocolate and turns snakes into chocolate and feeds these to his congregation.

A post on Facebook as revealed a prophet who commands rocks into bread and cloth to taste like chocolate and turns snakes into chocolate and feeds these to his congregation.

web_photo_Prophet Penuel

A post on Facebook as revealed a prophet who commands rocks into bread and cloth to taste like chocolate and turns snakes into chocolate and feeds these to his congregation.

A post on Facebook as revealed a prophet who commands rocks into bread and cloth to taste like chocolate and turns snakes into chocolate and feeds these to his congregation.

JOHANNESBURG – Christianity dominates our religious landscape, with 80 percent of South Africans following the teachings of Jesus Christ.

But some modern churches seem to expect their congregants to do bizarre things in order to achieve salvation.

What makes people attend these churches and what powers do the authorities have to regulate them?

Karl Marx is famously quoted to have said that “religion is the opium of the people” it is “ the sign of the oppressed creature…the soul of soulless conditions”.

In South Africa close to 7-million households live in extreme poverty and many are drawn to churches that promise to uplift them.

The problem is, with no limitations on who can start a church, these spring up everywhere, without any accountability.

CheckPoint investigates some of these churches and why so many people fall for their sometimes bizarre practices.