Exclusive: One man's search for dignity in death

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An increasing number of terminally ill patients want the courts to rule that they be allowed to choose when and how to die. Annika Larsen reports on one man who wanted to die on his own terms, and kept a video diary to explain why.

CAPE TOWN - More and more terminally-ill patients want the courts to rule that they be allowed to choose when and how to die.

The recent court ruling in favour of Robert Stransham-Ford being allowed to seek assisted suicide has raised the issue once again.

Stransham-Ford died before the ruling and it was specific to his case.  However, opinion remains strongly divided.

Avron Moss was diagnosed with virulent melanoma in August 2014.

He was given six months to live.

In that time, he began searching for a painless way to die -- on his own terms.

He kept a video diary so lawmakers could understand why he wanted to die.

Moss was a paediatric neuropsychologist – part of his job was to explain to parents of terminally-ill children that they were going to die.

He had seen a lot of suffering and knew that once the cancer spread to his brain, life would become unbearable.

He intended to launch a legal case to secure his right to die through medically assisted suicide.

The pain became unbearable – the cancer was spreading faster than expected – and Moss spent several weeks planning his own death.

* eNCA reporter Annika Larsen filed this report on Moss. Watch the video in the gallery above.

** For more on this story, watch the video in the gallery above.