Software giant exposed in Guptaleaks

Photo_Web_amaB_Logo_150317

The amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism, an independent non-profit.

The amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism, an independent non-profit.

Photo_Web_amaB_Logo_150317

The amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism, an independent non-profit.

The amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism, an independent non-profit.

JOHANNESBURG - German software giant SAP is the latest company to be implicated in questionable dealings with the Guptas.

Emails and other evidence reportedly reveal that the German multinational signed a commission deal with a small Gupta-controlled company.

The terms of the agreement suggest that the Gupta company was to help secure a contract with Transnet in return for a kickback.  

Sam Sole, managing partner in the Amabhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism --- which has been instrumental in leaking the Gupta e-mails -- said that it took two to do the corruption tango: the bribe taker and the bribe payer.

"In this case, we have a so-called commission agreement, that looks very much like a kickback, paid by this German multinational, SAP, to secure business worth at least R100-million.

"They signed a 10-percent-commission agreement with a small company that had absolutely no experience selling software to Transnet or anyone else. They sold 3D printers, Transnet never had business dealings with them before. The person at Transnet they were supposedly targeting had never even heard of this company. And yet it was promised 10 percent of at least R100-million."

READ: Former assistants accuse Guptas of sexual harassment

Sole said the police should be investigating the wrongdoing exposed in the Guptaleaks.

"It’s not our job as investigative journalists to do the police's job for them. 

"There's enough evidence that we've placed in the public domain for police to use their own tools ... to subpoena evidence from banks, the various Gupta companies, from the state-owned entities, from businesses ... there are plenty of channels. We don't have the right to subpoena evidence, they do, yet there's been this deafening silence."