EXPLAINER: Fourteen cricket terms for novice fans

Cricket Batsman About to Hit Ball During Outdoor Cricket Match - stock photo

Cricket Batsman About to Hit Ball During Outdoor Cricket Match

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JOHANNESBURG - With many television sets stuck on the 2019 Cricket World Cup, it may be wise to join in the excitement and learn a cricket term or two. 

eNCA.com has complied a list of phrases, with the help of tutorialsport.comespncricinfo.com and Sportsdefinitions.com to help you better understand the game and sound like you know what you're talking about. 

  1. Run - The basic unit of scoring in cricket. It is scored when a batsman hits the ball and runs between the stumps. It's usually scored in ones, twos and threes. 

  2. Four - The ball hit by the batsman crosses the boundary rope by rolling on the ground. This is called a boundary or four runs. 

  3. Six - The batsman hits the ball in the air and over the boundary rope. The batsman is given six runs. 

Cricket Batsman Hitting Ball During Cricket Match In Stadium - stock photo

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  • Crease - The line in front of the wickets. 

  • Boundary - The perimeter of the cricket field or the act of a batsman scoring a four or a six.

  • Wide - A delivery that pitches too far away from the batsman and is impossible to score off. The umpire will single this by stretching his arms out horizontally. An extra (run not scored by the batsman) will be added to the total and the ball will be bowled again.

  • No-ball - If a bowler's foot crosses the crease while delivering the ball, it is called a no-ball. A bowled ball that is directed above the waist of the batsman without pitching on the ground is also a no-ball. 

  • Off-side - The side of the pitch which is to the batsman's right (if right-handed) or left (if left-handed).

  • Bowled - When a batsman misses the ball and the stumps behind him are disturbed. He is then declared out and leaves the field. 

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  • Caught - The batsman is declared out when the fielder catches the ball before it hits the field. The batsman is also declared out if the ball is hit and the wicket-keeper catches it.

  • Run-out - If the fielder catches the ball and disturbs the stumps with the ball while the batsman is not in the crease after playing the shot, the batsman is run-out and leaves the field. 

  • LBW -  A batsman can be called out if any part of his body, clothing or equipment intercepts, a ball that would have hit the wicket, providing the ball pitched, or would have pitched, in a straight line between the wicket - even above the bails.

  • Duck - A score of zero when getting out. 

  • Nelson - The English superstition is that 111 and its multiples are unlucky. The sticks resemble 111. Double Nelson is 222. 

 

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eNCA