Nothing agreed yet on Brexit: UK government

web_photo_Theresa_May_20102017

Britain Prime minister Theresa May gives a press during the EU leaders summit at the building Council of the European Union in Brussels on October 20, 2017.

Britain Prime minister Theresa May gives a press during the EU leaders summit at the building Council of the European Union in Brussels on October 20, 2017.

web_photo_Theresa_May_20102017

Britain Prime minister Theresa May gives a press during the EU leaders summit at the building Council of the European Union in Brussels on October 20, 2017.

Britain Prime minister Theresa May gives a press during the EU leaders summit at the building Council of the European Union in Brussels on October 20, 2017.

LONDON - The British government said on Wednesday that nothing had been finalised in talks with the European Union on leaving the bloc, declining to comment on media reports it had reached a deal on the size of its Brexit divorce bill.

"I have never commented on speculation, of which there is much. I&39;m not going to start now," British Prime Minister Theresa May&39;s spokesperson said.

READ: May urges EU to &39;step forward&39; with UK for Brexit deal

"The talks are ongoing. The prime minister has been very clear that where we have obligations we will meet them. She equally has been very clear that the United Kingdom and the EU-27 need to take a step forward together, and she has been clear that nothing is agreed until everything is agreed."

Meanwhile European Union chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said on Wednesday that the bloc had to be united in dealing with Britain on its withdrawal and warned that failure to reach agreement would be "very bad."

READ: Britain and EU clash over who takes next Brexit step

"No deal would be a very bad deal," Barnier said, switching from French to English in a speech to Germany&39;s BDA employers association. It was his third speech to a German audience on Brexit in the day so far.

Barnier also said he hoped to have made progress on the principles of Britain&39;s divorce from the EU by next week and that London knew it could not have one foot in the single market and one foot out of it.