World's oldest lady turns 115

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The world's oldest woman, Misao Okawa, celebrates her 115th birthday on 5 March 2013, after receiving flowers at the Kurenai nursing home in Osaka, western Japan. (AFP PHOTO / TOMOHITO OKADA / MURSING HOME KURENAI)

The world's oldest woman, Misao Okawa, celebrates her 115th birthday on 5 March 2013, after receiving flowers at the Kurenai nursing home in Osaka, western Japan. (AFP PHOTO / TOMOHITO OKADA / MURSING HOME KURENAI)

web_image_Misao_Okawa_turns_115

The world's oldest woman, Misao Okawa, celebrates her 115th birthday on 5 March 2013, after receiving flowers at the Kurenai nursing home in Osaka, western Japan. (AFP PHOTO / TOMOHITO OKADA / MURSING HOME KURENAI)

The world's oldest woman, Misao Okawa, celebrates her 115th birthday on 5 March 2013, after receiving flowers at the Kurenai nursing home in Osaka, western Japan. (AFP PHOTO / TOMOHITO OKADA / MURSING HOME KURENAI)

OSAKA, JAPAN - The world&39;s oldest woman celebrated her 115th birthday on Tuesday 5 March 2013, being pampered by staff at her nursing home.

Misao Okawa was treated to her favourite dish, noodles and marinated mackerel sushi, and as a lover of shawls, she received a brown and white polka dot one.

Along with the gift came a strawberry and whipped creamed topped cake as well as some flowers

Born to a clothing merchant in 1898, Okawa says the secret to longevity is eating well and sleeping well.

Japanese media report that she&39;s never suffered a major illness, and that she only uses a wheelchair to prevent her from falling over.

Okawa married in 1919 and has three children, two of whom are still living and are already into their 90&39;s.  She also has four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

In February this year she was honoured by The Guinness World Records as being the oldest living woman in the world.

According to a United Nations report, Japan is a nation with the longest average lifespan.  Prior to Okawa&39;s record, the oldest living woman was a fellow Japanese, Koto Okubo, who passed away in January.  And the world&39;s oldest man also lives in Japan - he&39;ll turn 116 in April.

The number of Japanese centenarians reportedly stands at more than 50,000.