Grinding inflation clouds 'Black Friday' shopping bonanza

The day after Thanksgiving, 'Black Friday' marks the unofficial start of the holiday shopping season

The day after Thanksgiving, 'Black Friday' marks the unofficial start of the holiday shopping season. Getty Images via AFP/George Frey

NEW YORK - The Black Friday kickoff of the holiday shopping season is expected to bring especially deep discounts in 2022, but one challenge will be finding consumers confident enough to spend.

Grinding inflation in the world's biggest economy in recent months has cast uncertainty over this year's festive season, which kicks off the day after Thursday's Thanksgiving holiday.

A year ago, retailers faced product shortfalls in the wake of shipping backlogs and Covid-19-related factory closures. To avert a repeat, the industry front-loaded its holiday imports this year, leaving it vulnerable to oversupply at a time when consumers are cutting back.

"Supply shortages was yesterday's problem," said Neil Saunders, managing director for GlobalData Retail, a consultancy. "Today's problem is having too much stuff."

Saunders said retailers have made progress in recent months in reducing excess inventories but that oversupply created banner conditions for bargain-hunters in many categories, including electronics, home improvement and apparel.

Higher costs for gasoline and household staples like meat and cereal are an economy-wide issue, but do not burden everyone equally.

"The lower incomes are definitely hit worst by the higher inflation," said Claire Li, a senior analyst at Moody's. "People have to spend on the essential items." 

Leading forecasts from Deloitte and the National Retail Federation project a single-digit percentage increase, but it likely won't exceed the inflation rate.

The consumer price index has been up about eight percent on an annual basis, which means that a similar size increase in holiday sales would equate with lower volumes.

US shoppers have remained resilient throughout the myriad stages of the Covid-19 pandemic, often spending more than expected, even when consumer sentiment surveys suggest they are in a gloomy mood.

Source
AFP

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